Alessio
Gianardi

1983, La Spezia

TESTIMONE (2016)

In architecture, every window was the window both of an artist and of everyman, the window of childish letters: “Tell me what you see from your window, etc..” In actual fact, only a similar opening remained, be as it may, whether it was that opening onto his village or any other one to lean out of. The co in and the window represent incredible stories but from a constructive point of view they are not unalike. And the palazzo and everything else missed an event that had already taken place, somewhere: here or elsewhere.

Aldo Rossi, Autobiografia Scientifica, 1990

“Osteology” is a highly frequent term in the writings of Aldo Rossi: it is not used in the common sense, but rather it is declined in reference to his own architecture.

Osteological is the spine which, in his project for the cemetery of San Cataldo in Modena (1971 – 1978), links the cone of the chimneystack to the cube of the ossuary, as important as bones are for a sh. The ossuary itself draws on the same etymological root, and the square is the constructive model of this architecture: an essential, osteological shape.

The creation of a cyanotypical impression from an opening of the ossuary of San Cataldo testifies to the architecture through a photographic process in direct contact with the construction. In this way its reproduction is on a scale of 1:1, insofar as the sign referenced constitutes that very opening, arousing a justified ambiguity of what the light really has impressed onto it, whether it is the architecture or what goes through it.

QUI A DEUX FEMMES PERD SON ÂME, QUI A DEUX MAISON PERD SA RAISON ** (2015)

To know is to remember

In this way Plato argues discussing about reminiscence:  the awareness and the understanding of information are not related to empiricism but to perceptible experience. The senses recall the ideas as universal forms through which the world has been shaped and that allow us to know it. It is through this process that we are able to find the resemblance with something familiar, something dear.

The time for gestation is slow: the maturation of ideas and the assimilation of contents bring on the surface the important things, the essential ones, that we can’t go without anymore. We fall in love and that is the deepest in man and, as human beings, when we lack in what we love it is natural to come across something that brings us home, feeling the same love that we feel for the original subject.

In this set-up, the brick, intended as the repository of the idea, is the realization of the will and the use of desire to incorporate in one entity two distant images, made closer only by thought:  the simplicity of the shapes created by lichens on a rock finds its outline in the chewing-gums in a urban setting. The modular construction separates and identifies two spatial contexts, spontaneously incompatible.

Which one is the simulacrum, which one the copy? Which one is the love, which one the lover?
To whom to be faithful?

Qui a deux femmes perd son âme, qui a deux maisons perd sa raison (in English, Chi ha due donne perde l’anima, chi ha due case perde il senno) is a false popular saying inspired to Chrètien De Troys, derived from “Les nuits de la plein lune” by Eric Rohmer, 1984.

 

Works

Alessio Gianardi, Testimone, 2016, cyanotype on cotton cloth
Alessio Gianardi, Qui a deux femmes perd son âme, qui a deux maison perd sa raison, 2015, installation: gelatin silver print on autoclaved aerated concrete
Alessio Gianardi, Qui a deux femmes perd son âme, qui a deux maison perd sa raison, 2015, installation: gelatin silver print on autoclaved aerated concrete
Alessio Gianardi, Qui a deux femmes perd son âme, qui a deux maison perd sa raison, 2015, installation: gelatin silver print on autoclaved aerated concrete